post

High-Rise

high

Markus Rating: 1half star

Maybe after watching “Snowpiercer” and the Terry Gilliam canon, director Ben Wheatley decided to make a movie about people in a confined location, broken down into class systems, until all hell breaks loose (adapted from a novel by J.G. Ballard).

Synopsis: In a future where dogs are consumed and drowned, a bunch of people live in a high-rise and act peculiar. There are meant to be five buildings with a grand lake in the middle, acting as a palm of sorts (and the buildings are the fingers). This particular high-rise is the first one to be completed and seems to be all encompassing; there is a supermarket on the 15th floor, an entire floor dedicated to playing squash on, etc; with the wealthy living on the upper floors and the working-class on the lower. A doctor (played by Tom Hiddleston) moves in, but seems like a fish out of water within the upper class. It doesn’t help that everyone seems to know his business before he opens his mouth and that he begins to be put into very awkward Gilliam-esque social situations, time and time again.

With the best cinematography I’ve seen in any film all year, at many times “High-Rise” displays storytelling that can only be described as “incoherent”; except for every establishing shot, which shows Wheatley’s eye for spatial recognition (you are always aware of how high in up in the building you are at all times). But if you’re looking for a coherent storyline, then look elsewhere.  And if you make it to the second hour, you will only become more frustrated and more visually put-off by the nonsensical plot developments.

Final Thought: “High-Rise” seems to have a point about class systems being evil, but I don’t know what it is saying that hasn’t been said before, with much less “abstract meaning within the meaningless” sequences. Thus, the overall issue comes down to the fact that without a doubt 90% of audiences either  won’t grasp onto the odd little eccentricities that moves this story forward or won’t care enough to do so; basically giving up on this beautiful looking train-wreck, eventually.

Follow me on Twitter @moviesmarkus

post

I Saw the Light

i saw the light

Markus Rating: 2 stars

There are all sorts of ways to tell someone’s story. But by far, a by-the-numbers type biopic is the most boring. Far too plain to pay homage in any kind of impactful way, “I Saw the Light” is deserving of little more than a spot on the Lifetime Channel.

Synopsis: The life and times of country-western singer, Hank Williams Sr.

Problem is (aside from the vanilla handling of the live fast, die young material) for the most part this movie flies though certain aspects of the story without explanation or exposition. I really never got to know who Hank Williams Sr. truly was. And it is my opinion that no matter how famous the subject, if one has to be a diehard fan or have read a book to grasp onto what they are watching, the director and/or screenwriter(s) (in this case, Marc Abraham) have failed their audience.

The performances from Tom Hiddleston (Hank Williams Sr.) and Elizabeth Olsen (Audrey Williams, Hank’s first wife) are more than serviceable, as these are two emerging powerhouses in their field. And at the end of the day, no matter how much I believe Abraham mishandled this story, “I Saw the Light” was always going to live and die on Hiddleston’s singing abilities (as Hiddleston’s actual singing voice is used in this film); an aspect which Abraham wasn’t afraid to put into the forefront of his feature. And the results are…well, he’s no Joaquin Phoenix.

Final Thought: It is impossible not to draw comparisons to James Mangold’s “Walk the Line”, as the both are bios of legendary country-western singers set within a decade of one another. But when you realize that “I Saw the Light” shows its hand within the first 20 minutes (meaning: this film was all it was ever going to be within the first 20 minutes) you may find yourself sinking in your seat, as the comparison will become so distractingly overwhelming, that it should find a majority to perceive “I Saw the Light” as instantly forgettable.

Follow me on Twitter @moviesmarkus

post

Captain America: Civil War

Captain-America-Civil-War-International-poster-excerpt

Markus Rating:3-and-a-Half-Stars-Wht

With a first half that is little more than an overlong political drama and a second half filled with huge action, Whedon-esque quips from a multitude of super-cameos; capped off with a single (masterful) revelation sequence, the main reason “Captain America: Civil War” only garners 3 ½ stars has to do with a finale where…How do I say this without spoiling things?…“Captain America: Civil War”, a movie which contains the epic Iron Man vs. Captain America confrontation; a confrontation which has been at least four films in the making, settles on a resolution that can only be described as “civil”.

Synopsis: Do the Avengers do more harm than good?  NATO thinks so, as they petition to garner control of this super-group, after global outcry from citizens who were a part of the collateral damage seen in the last two Avengers films, request governmental restraint on the independently run team. This diplomatic plot device divides the group; with unresolved results.

Is it me or did that plot seem way too CNN for a superhero movie? Well, that’s because it was. And the deeper into the political well the extremely talkie “Civil War” fell into, the harder it became for me to wrap my mind around the fact that I potentially could be stuck watching an entire superhero film consisting of a series of repetitive moral and ethical round table discussions for 2 ½ hours.

Mid-Second Act, with the emergence of cameos from Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) Ant-Man (Paul Rudd)and the new Spider-Man (Tom Holland) who was shockingly the best part of the film, “Civil War” becomes the action packed superhero movie I’d been promised. During these moments (and only during these moments) do directors Anthony and Joe Russo shine. It just took so long to get there, as the plot did not warrant the pacing displayed within the first hour or so.

And it all seemed to be going well. I was now entertained. During the final Act I had become immersed in a Greek tragedy plot twist which had me leaning forward in my seat (essentially in a bloodlust). And then… Bottom line, the conclusion to this film was surprisingly tame. So much so, that in the end “Civil War” comes off as a set-up 3 ½ star film for an upcoming 5 Star film, rather than the 5 Star film all of its predecessors had been leading up to.

Final Thought: Not only was “Captain America: Winter Soldier” a better movie, but so was “Batman v. Superman”.

Follow me @moviesmarkus

post

Straight Outta Compton

Straight Outta Compton

Markus Rating:

Rated R for language throughout, strong sexuality/nudity, violence, and drug use

If you’re interested, then this movie will be interesting; at least for a while (more or less the first 90 minutes of this 2 ½ hour bio-“epic”. “Straight Outta Compton” tells the story of revolutionary rap group, N.W.A. (Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, Eazy-E, MC Ren, Dj Yella). Kicking off on the streets of Compton, California 1986 and documenting the groups rise as the pioneers of “gangsta rap”, their tumultuous break up, allegedly due to underhanded management from Jerry Heller (Paul Giamatti) and introducing branches of rap legends which expanded from the N.W.A. tree, e.g. Snoop Dogg, Tu-Pac, etc. Problem is (much like that last sentence) the movie is just too damn long! And once Eazy-E starts coughing, the whole thing turns into an after school special, primarily due to an overarching repetitive atmosphere which director F. Gary Gray (Friday, Set It Off) seems to choose over subtlety more often than not.

There were a few sequences that made me lean forward in my seat (The live performance of “F— the Police”, for one) and the script itself from Jonathan Herman and Andrea Berloff (World Trade Center) does its job; even going above and beyond at times, inserting a few “audience winks” throughout (I mean, there’s even a “bye Felicia” joke thrown into the mix). But it was the acting which was undoubtedly the stand-out aspect of this movie, highlighted by a performance from Ice Cube’s own son, O’Shea Jackson Jr., who, in his first ever acting gig, hits it out of the park playing his father.

Here’s the problem: The difference between “Straight Outta Compton” and an actual N.W.A. album is one carries a gritty, raw authenticity, and the other stars Paul Giamatti.

Not to say that there aren’t guns in this movie (or drugs or police brutality for that matter) but the fact that “Straight Outta Compton” looks so cinematic is an issue.

When comparing this to a movie like “Boyz n the Hood”, which while “fiction”, portrays an honest and personal look into the streets of Los Angeles during a similar time frame, I can safely say that I remember finding myself absolutely immersed in John Singleton’s depiction of said setting; to the point where by the end I felt as if I knew the neighborhood without even setting foot in the neighborhood. In retrospect this form of direction aided in my bond with other aspects of the film, acting as the connective tissue between me and the characters on screen.

“Straight Outta Compton” portrays true to life characters, all who actually grew up in Compton, but Gray’s glossy (and viciously repetitive) direction really gives viewers more of a distracting “XD” version of a story that deserved a grittier presentation.

Final Thought: It is obvious that Gray has a talent for music video direction and the cinematography here is technically perfect; just not for this movie, and thus curbing my viewing experience and creating a disconnect which resulted in me getting bored after the 90 minute mark.

By the way: Everyone who isn’t dead, in prison or white gets out of this film scot-free. And while I am not an expert on the breakup of N.W.A. (I was around 5 when it actually happened) the fact that this film took 10 years (as stated by Ice Cube himself) to make, leads me to believe a multitude of financial parties had to come to an agreement as to what could be shown and what past actions could do damage in the court of public opinion, and thus would need to be left on the cutting room floor. So, just a heads up: this is not a scathing expose detailing Dr. Dre’s abuse towards women, or anything like that. That said, this fact should not be held against the film itself, as it really has no bearing on ones viewing experience. Still, I believe that audiences have the right to know before entering the theater.

Follow me on Twitter @moviesmarkus

Written by Markus Robinson, Edited by Nicole I. Ashland